Dec 192014
 

Business and holiday leisure travelers flying today, December 19, 2014, the busiest air travel day of the year, at 2.5 million passengers, and on through January 4, 2015, will amount to about 45 million passengers or about an average of 2.4 million passengers a day, according to U.S. air travel industry trade association, Airlines for America.

The top 10 busiest airport hubs today in which you will be waiting for your flight arrivals and departures are:

#10 Charlotte

#9 Miami

#8 San Francisco

#7 Phoenix

#6 Denver

#5 JFK

#4 Dallas-Fort Worth

#3 Orlando

#2 Los Angeles

#1 Atlanta

Photo Credit: First-Class Seating on Virgin America

And, airlines are making the room for you inside their aircraft, adding 2.4 percent more capacity seating, albeit not too much legroom back in coach.

So, today the planes will be packed to the full. It’s the holiday season!

We will just have to patiently wait in the lines and grin and bear it. Naturally, as always, we will be safely home soon.

Notwithstanding, I will stuff my large body into that middle seat of an over-crowded airplane, endure the snores and elbow punches of my broad-shouldered neighbors, receive the kicks on my seat from the toddler behind me, or accept the uncharitable self-interest of the passenger in front of me, who reclines their seat into my lap.

Why is it that the beverage-cart comes to my row last? And, by the time they get to me, they are out of ginger ale? Who among us has not had similar experiences on a flight?

Oh well, let’s all hope that one day air travel will once again become an adventure – now portrayed in aviation folklore inside the American television drama Pan Am – that we gaze upon with enjoyment, excitement, and elation.

So that once more getting there is almost as gratifying as the places we are coming from and going to.

“Fly Large In First-Class” Around The World Over The Holidays.

Photo Credit: A $23,000 First-Class Suite Connection on our international partner Singapore Airlines

Live it up in First-Class after today and through the holidays, particularly on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day 2015, as these are the four slowest days of the winter holiday air travel season.

Nonetheless, a few hot international flight deals may still be available after today on some of America’s air carriers, connecting with some glorious international carrier partners with as low as just 3 days advance notice (prior to the above four slowest days), priority security and boarding, complimentary food and drinks, and luxurious sleeping amenities.

America’s air travel industry forecasters expect roughly 13 percent of holiday period air travelers on board domestic air carriers are flying abroad to and from the United States.

Here’s the Christmas Gift: Some 42,000 additional international seats per day are available through America’s air carriers this winter holiday season compared to what was available during previous holiday seasons over the past two years (2012-13). Book now to fly by January 2, 2015.

Here’s the catch:Lowest sale fares are available only on certain itineraries. Seats are limited, subject to availability, and may not be available on all flights. Flights may not operate daily. Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. For First Class, changes or cancellations can be made without a fee; an increase in fare will be collected, if applicable. Any remaining balance will be placed in a guest’s travel bank, good for travel on most of America’s air carriers for one year from date of issue. Travelers who no-show without a change or cancellation prior to the scheduled departure time will forfeit the amount of this fare.”

Here’s a better flight plan: According to Airlines for America blog, “We’re sure you’ve already packed strategically, checked in online and loaded your boarding pass to your mobile device. But just in case your evenings have instead been filled with holiday parties and you’re hoping to toss a few sweaters in the suitcase along with your favorite pair of jeans (crossing fingers that everything matches), here are 12 travel tips that have nothing to do with maids-a-milking or pear trees!”

Why We Love To Fly

Flying nowadays is like childbirth for a woman. She knows this special journey will take nine-months. Along the way, the ride will be bumpy; she won’t always be comfortable; and other people might at times really annoy her. But the ultimate result is well-worth the journey it took to get there.

So, we love to fly.

‘Oh my god, we got to do this,’ we say quietly to ourselves with love.

Focused more on the destination, instead of the challenges of the journey associated with getting there, we bear it.

Flying enables freedom. Being close to the world’s busiest airport in Atlanta has allowed me to fly direct to Europe and Asia to personally visit our customers. Peter Stewart, Senior Vice President for Strategic Global Collaboration Services at PGi

We offer this analogy to make the simple point that in spite of all the convenience and inconveniences we face and various degrees of service quality we receive, we still choose to fly.

I love to fly because it opens up the world to me and the university that I serve.” E. Gordon Gee, West Virginia University President

Deep-down we are fascinated with flying. Flying makes possible our freedom. It is also a commodity we cannot do without, much like our cellphones and our mobile internet. Voyage and air travel makes our holiday season brighter and our world more accessible.

… I am continuously struck by the magic of it all. Lewis and Clark took about three years to reach the Pacific and back to St. Louis. And I travel back and forth to Portland, Oregon from Washington, DC regularly in two days. I have seen a lot of the world and realized many friendships and wonderful memories, because of the magic of flying. Short of Star Trek’s ‘beam me down and beam me up,’ that is about as good as it gets.” – Edward Ray, Oregon State University President

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Reprint of this article appears inside this international airline travel news media outlet:

Classic Cover Photo courtesy of the Boeing Company. A full-scale mock-up of the interior of the Boeing 747’s passenger model. When the 747 airliner was first launched, Boeing initially expected to sell only about four hundred 747 passenger planes and designed them for easy conversion into cargo carriers. When the passenger seats were removed, the fuselage could accommodate containers stacked two units wide, two units high, and two or three ranks deep.

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